What Are You Doing to Adapt to Change during the COVID-19 Crisis?

German Sacristan
Apr 14, 2020

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Darwin famously said, “It is not the strongest of species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” No truer words could ever be spoken about 2020, the year forever marked by the reality that is COVID-19. Most companies today are struggling, while others have found a way to adapt to the current environment—most likely, this will pave the way to future success.

To do that, the leaders of these companies are often using their big hearts before their brains. They adapt to change by holistically focusing on their communities before they focus on themselves. It’s only then that they can identify real needs and provide unconditional help. That is what makes them different— helping at difficult times without expecting anything in return. Communities and markets never forget who helped them and, most importantly, how.

Estudios Durero, a 100-employee print-for-pay company focusing on graphic communications, art, and photo applications in northern Spain, saw its production down to zero over the last few weeks (like many other businesses around the world). Company leaders, responding quickly to the coronavirus situation, knew right away that Estudios Durero needed to focus on being helpful—nothing more, nothing less. The company had some plastic stock materials and decided to invest the time by producing face protection screens, which medical personnel needs to avoid infection. To date, Estudios Durero manufactured and donated 11,000 pieces with a sales value of €25,000.

That great contribution and gesture led to an inquiry about producing now-scarce hospital coats. Even though clothing design and manufacturing are not at the company’s core, it does have textile cutters and industrial sewing machines for production of retail displays.

Retail light displays made of fabric (requires textile printing, cutting, and sewing).

The graphics team designed the coats, but mass producing them still needed to be addressed. So, in addition to making the coats inhouse (but, again, thinking outside the box), the company created a network by partnering with people with sewing machines at home. About 5,000 coats are now being manufactured every day and sold at cost, not for profit.

The story went viral and has since been broadcast on TV and radio. Estudios Durero’s brand has become very recognizable—to the point that the company is constantly receiving messages from existing clients and non-customers saying how proud they are to have a supplier like Estudios Durero.

The marketing impact is huge, and it all started with the ability and desire to change. Not only has the company positioned itself for future success, but it’s also keeping half of its employees working. Staff appreciation and a strong commitment to the company are very much on display, indeed.

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