Posts tagged: SGIA

Mal Baboyian and the New Canon Océ Colorado 1640

Jim Hamilton
 Mar 10, 2017

Mal Baboyian has 45 years of industry experience, an extremely long job title, and a lot of responsibility at Canon. He’s the Senior Vice President of Canon U.S.A.’s Business Imaging Solutions Group for Océ Product Marketing and Support. This covers a wide range of Océ-branded products, including two exciting new devices: the ProStream continuous-feed color inkjet printer and the Colorado 1640 64″ wide format UVgel roll-to-roll printer. This week at the One Canon press/analyst event in Boca Raton, Florida was the worldwide unveiling of the Colorado 1640 and Baboyian thinks it is Océ’s most important wide format graphic arts product introduction in 25 years. To say that he’s excited about this product would be an understatement—and this is a man who has seen quite a few wide format products. For one, he has helped Canon Océ to reach 6,000 unit placements worldwide in the very successful Arizona product line.

Here’s a quick summary of why Baboyian is so excited about the 1640. First off, it is very fast and quite affordable (MSRP, $58,000). Ink consumption and overall running costs are projected to be at quite attractive levels. In addition, the new Canon-developed UVgel inks have a large color CMYK gamut, give off little or no odor, dry immediately, and use low-temperature LED curing. Some very innovative supply and quality control features (to be explained shortly) top off the list.

Canon Océ Colorado 1640

Canon Océ Colorado 1640

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2013: A Turning Point for Inkjet in Production

Jim Hamilton
 Dec 10, 2013
Though inkjet has been a hot topic since 2008 (remember the ‘inkjet’ drupa?), it is hard to underestimate the continuing impact inkjet is having across all areas of the graphic arts. I think 2013 marks an interesting turning point. Inkjet is everywhere from document printing to labels & packaging to decorative to functional and 3D printing.

Gartner Hype Cycle

3D printing had to be one of the most talked about topics of 2013 and jetting technologies are the key behind many 3D printing implementations (though in this case they are jetting materials rather than inks). That being said, in my opinion 3D printing has reached what Gartner likes to call the ‘Peak of Inflated Expectations’ and others have described as ‘Irrational Exuberance.’ The way some people talk about 3D printing you’d think that before long you’ll be 3D printing your beer complete with the bottle (with a label on the outside and a cap on top).

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Big Iron and New Ink at SGIA

Other Posts
 Oct 12, 2009

I’m just getting back from the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association (SGIA) show in New Orleans, LA. I am working on a more detailed write-up, but in short I think there were two distinct sets of wide format digital printing equipment developments.

At the front of the show floor, basically right next to each other, the leading high-end wide format graphics hardware suppliers like Durst, EFI, Fujifilm, and HP were showing off their latest equipment and tools. Durst had its new Rho 900 flatbed printer and Rho 1000 printer, EFI was leading with the new GS-3200 and new Fiery XF RIP product, Fujifilm was demonstrating the Onset S20,its new UviStar 3.2- and 5-meter wide UV-curable inkjet printers. The UviStar models are private-labeled from Matan. HP has the widest portfolio of products in the wide format graphics market, and was at SGIA with equipment ranging from its high-end flatbed inkjet printers to its new low-end “Latex” printer (more on that in just a minute). All of those vendors were reporting that they were closing deals right there on the show floor. The trend on the high-end is clearly about the tools that make up solutions and help customers build and operate their wide format business more effectively,with Fujifilm showing its Print Run Controller software, the new EFI Fiery XF solution and HP’s Capture program all taking a position.

The other big development was on the ink side, where I should note the aforementioned Latex printer, but also identify new inks from Roland DG and Seiko I Infotech. HP’s Latex ink has a lot of appeal in and of itself because of the low VOC emission and good image durability. The reaction I got from one of the HP resellers I spoke to was very strong, he told me “HP is going to sell a ton of those”. On the eco-/light-/mild-solvent inkjet side, there were new printer models but also new ink formulations. Roland’s new printer is the first to use a metallic silver inkjet ink, so this represents something of a breakthrough, and the examples in Roland booth illustrated the great effects that can be created using these metallic inks. The printer will start shipping later this year. Also on the solvent side, SII announced a new ink set called “EG Outdoor-LX” which are lower-priced than the company’s “EG Outdoor-EX” ink sets. These new inks are less expensive and come in larger cartridges than the EX-series ink, but do not offer the same outdoor durability.

The SGIA show was smaller and the attendance was lower compared to past years. There was very limited participation in the event from the screen-printing side. New Orleans did not draw the attendee-vacationers that Las Vegas or Orlando usually does, but according to the vendors I spoke with, attendees at SGIA were ready to do business, so just about all of the vendors I spoke to were pretty happy. We’ll be publishing that more detailed write-up of SGIA later this week.

Seen at SGIA – Productivity enhancements

Other Posts
 Oct 22, 2008

One of the things that is shaping up in the wide format market is the increasing focus on overall productivity. At SGIA HP launched a new high-speed wide format printer called the FB7500. This printer is the product of years of research in high-speed production environments, specifically screen printing environments. In addition to using HP’s X2 print head technology, and new formulation of UV-curable inkjet inks, the new FB7500 has what the company calls a “three-quarters” automatic feeding system, which reduces the labor required to run the printer and improves the media load times because the system loads and lines up the media automatically. What I like about this new automation feature is that it is a lot like the kind of automation advances we’ve seen in the offset market that have been beneficial to that class of equipment in terms of units sold. One of the people who worked on the FB7500 told me that they have visited production printing establishments for years to get input on what characteristics of wide format digital printers need to be improved, the features of the FB7500 are a direct result of a lot of that work.

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