Posts tagged: printer

Lexmark International Set to Acquire Kofax Ltd

Anne Valaitis
 Mar 25, 2015

 

 

In what seems to be shaping up as an exciting year in document and information technology, late yesterday it was announced that Lexmark International would seek to acquire Kofax Ltd for approximately $11 a share, or $1 billion. Upon news of the agreement, Kofax shares spiked 36%.  This is most certainly a disruptive move by Lexington, Kentucky-based Lexmark, and it positions them to be a “powerhouse” in intelligent capture and document processing while adding sophisticated platform capabilities for BPM.

Lexmark’s most recent acquisitions:

 

Lexmark’s acquisition spree kicked off in 2010, when the company acquired Kansas-based Perceptive Software (for a reported $280 million) with the goal of transitioning from a hardware-centric vendor to a solutions provider. Perceptive Software was a major provider of ECM software and solutions with specific strength in the higher education, healthcare and government sectors and its Image Now software platform offers a broad range of workflow solutions.

The marriage offered clear synergies for growth at a time when Lexmark’s revenue had slumped following the decline of the inkjet market.  Lexmark’s subsequent exit from the inkjet business reaffirmed the importance of new revenues streams. Lexmark, with its global infrastructure of direct & indirect channel for printing hardware, was an excellent fit for Perceptive with its advanced software solutions and vertical expertise. Both came from positions of strength in the medium sized business sector reaching up to the enterprise.

 

 

 

Irvine California-based Kofax provides a diverse set of software and platform solutions for information intensive customer interactions.  With $297 million in revenues reported in 2014, the company has direct sales operations in 30 countries and 850 channel partners working in 70 countries. Kofax has also made strategic acquisition investments in recent years.  In February 2013, Kofax acquired Altosoft to add business intelligence and analytics, then shortly after in July they acquired Kapow for data analytics. In September 2014, Kofax further strengthened its capabilities by obtaining Softpro GmbH for e-signature and fraud detection.
The combination of solutions from Lexmark (with Perceptive) and Kofax for sophisticated capture, intelligent routing, data mining/analytics and other key business processes creates a very strong and comprehensive portfolio.

“The acquisition of Kofax enhances our best-in-class offerings so our customers can capture, manage, access, and act upon their information more efficiently, and extends Lexmark into the high-growth smart process applications market,” said Paul Rooke, Lexmark chairman and chief executive officer. “Our customers will have a breadth of hardware and software solutions that connect their information silos and automate their business processes – enabling them to access the most relevant information at the moment they need it to drive business forward”.

“We believe joining forces with Lexmark benefits our customers, partners, employees and shareholders and the merger will build on Kofax’s rich history of continuous innovation,” said Reynolds C. Bish, chief executive officer, Kofax. “Our market-leading ability to simplify and transform the First Mile™ of customer engagement is a strong complement to Perceptive Software’s strength in managing information across silos. As a result, we’re excited about the future and working together to realize the full potential of this opportunity to the benefit of all stakeholders.”

 

The Kofax acquisition reflects Lexmark’s ever-growing emphasis on software (including enterprise content management, business process management, document output management, search, intelligent capture software, vertical-oriented solutions); other high value offerings like laser products and MPS; and creating synergies among all three. The Kofax pickup also provides Lexmark with strong end to end vertical industry solutions such as financial services, insurance and healthcare, thus providing a foothold in the entire document lifecycle.     This is a significant move for Lexmark into software, considering a short time ago they were primarily print focused. This industry will continue to change and transform rapidly away from printed pages, and towards flexible, sophisticated solutions designed to solve business problems.

 

Mobile printing and those “in-between” moments

Christine Dunne Dunne
 Nov 24, 2014

Close to three months ago, my family and I moved into a new home. For anyone who has experienced a move (probably most of us), you know how crazy it can be. Not only do you need to physically move and arrange your belongings, but you must also handle various administrative tasks as well as acclimate yourself to your new surroundings.

Boxes in our new home

The first few weeks in our home we were largely living out of boxes. We knew where our printer was, but we could not find any cables to set it up on a network or print directly from our PCs.

Normally, we would have just waited until we found these cables, but I needed to print! I needed to print, sign, and scan a number of documents for work, my bank, our mortgage company, and our homeowners’ insurance company. Read more »

Printer vendors post strong quarter

Christine Dunne Dunne
 Sep 10, 2014

In August, a variety of printer manufacturers announced their latest quarterly earnings. The table below includes percent changes in revenue and operating profit from last year (for the respective print business units), as well as key drivers for the shifts.

Latest vendor quarterly earnings


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Canon Advances its Production Digital Color Portfolio

Jim Hamilton
 May 29, 2014

At the Canon for Business 2014 event in Poing, Germany and at the FESPA trade show in Munich last week, Canon Océ showed strong signs of progress in a variety of areas related to digital color printing through a series of announcements:

  • High-speed color inkjet printing on standard coated offset papers’ Announced but not shown in Poing was a new inkjet system that Canon Océ representatives say can print on a range of offset paper stocks, including coated ones, without the use of bonding agents or primers. The solution, according to Canon, can accomplish this due to its high resolution, small ink droplets, dryers, and a special aqueous pigment ink formulation. The Canon Océ ImageStream 3500 runs at up to 160 meters per minute (525 feet per minute) at 1,200 x 600 dot per inch resolution on a 750-millimeter (30-inch) web. (The device can also run at 1,200 x 1,200 dpi, though at half the speed of 1,200 x 600.) Canon expects the product to be available at the beginning of 2015. InfoTrends will learn more about this product soon (Canon hosted analysts, including InfoTrends’ Ralf SchlÅ‘zer, in Tokyo last week), but for now, it’s intriguing to consider that a vendor has come up with a solution to address standard coated offset papers without inkjet treatments of any kind. (See Ralf Schlozer’s blog on the ImageStream 3500.)

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How do customers make purchase decisions?

Christine Dunne Dunne
 Jan 27, 2014

As part of InfoTrends’ research for clients, we have mapped the steps in the customer decision-making process. Typically, the customer journey includes six main steps: satisfied with current device, trigger event/need recognition, research and fact finding, evaluation of options, purchase, and usage experience.

Upon returning from my maternity leave a few weeks ago, I began wondering how I fit into this model. I received a multifunction printer (MFP) for Christmas that I had selected myself. As it turns out, my decision-making process aligns with the steps outlined above. I will discuss my experience below, followed by some questions print device vendors may like to consider. Read more »

The Inkjet Home User is Unhappy

Zac Butcher
 Mar 11, 2013

As a marketer I am constantly on the lookout for customer insight. Recently there have been two articles in the UK that resulted in inkjet printer customers willingly sharing what they believe, how they feel, and how these factors drive their behaviour. This is marketing gold dust: customer comments, people’s own words, no manufacturer influence–all without charge. For this reason I wanted to highlight and share two articles.

On February 23rd the Guardian published a piece focusing on the alleged reduction in ink volume in genuine inkjet cartridges. It appears that the Mail Online saw the Guardian article and ran with the idea, publishing its own interpretation on March 4th titled “The great printer rip off: Ink costs more than vintage champers–and devious new tricks mean you constantly have to buy refills.” The author discusses the declining volume of ink being put into cartridges in a style clearly designed to elicit a particular response from the readership. Whilst there is certainly bias resulting from the not very well hidden agenda, the comments are nevertheless instructive, and it is the responses that are my primary interest.

Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pooniesphotos/4605714856

 

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Print and Zombies

Jim Hamilton
 Nov 5, 2012

Somehow, zombies have crept into the debate about the value of print. Below are three recent examples of how print and zombies have been connected in some fashion on the Internet.

  1. Why Print Books Are Like Zombies — This blog is actually about digital rights management, but the point is that printed books live on and on (in your bookshelves, your attic, your basement, etc.). They never die. Nor can they be taken away from you by the publisher after you’ve bought them.
  2. Print Zombie — Is Print Dead? — This blog examines the future of print. It’s called Print Zombie because “Everyone knows if something dies, it just comes back stronger as a Zombie!”
  3. And my favorite: Print versus Digital — Who Survives the Zombies? — This imaginative and hilarious infographic provides compelling facts to support the theory that print is much better suited to survive a zombie attack.

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Frankly Speaking: No Printing Process Dies

Frank Romano
 Oct 4, 2012

These are the three devices that replicate paper-based documents in quantity: copier, printer, and press.

The difference between a copier and a printer is that the copier requires a hard copy original and the printer requires an electronic file. My guess is that very few, if any, copiers are manufactured any more. The light lens system has been replaced with a scanning system connected to a printer. A Multi Function Printer (MFP) is called that because it can copy, scan, print, and fax. Old habits die hard so they are still called copiers; although, most are really MFPs.

Printers evolved from Read more »

Inspiring Customer Passion: The 2012 Konica Minolta Dealer Event

Jim Hamilton
 Jan 18, 2012

More than 1,000 attendees have been in Las Vegas the past couple of days at the Bellagio hotel for Konica Minolta’s dealer event. This is the third such Konica Minolta event I’ve attended in the past few years. (See previous blogs on the one in Los Angeles in 2010 and Orlando in 2009. This year’s theme is “Inspire Customer Passion” and to bring that message home Konica Minolta presented an engaging mix of corporate presentations, an inspiring keynote by Tony Hsieh (CEO of Zappos and author of the book Delivering Happiness), and evening entertainment by Larry the Cable Guy.

Welcome to Fabulas Las Vegas

Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas

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Canon to Acquire Showa Information Systems

Jim Hamilton
 Nov 16, 2011

Last week Canon announced its plans to acquire Showa Information Systems (SIS), a Japanese manufacturer of high-end printing systems. If the acquisition goes as Canon expects it to, the deal will involve the purchase of around 12 million shares at a price of 200 yen per share. This would make the total sale more than 2.4 billion yen or about $31 million. Canon expects the share acquisition to be completed around May of 2012. Canon has already concluded an agreement with Showa Information Systems’ largest shareholder (Mars Engineering Corporation), which owns about 26% of SIS.

SIS was established in 1973 and has been active in the development of Japanese language processing technologies for office printers, including what it describes as the world’s first kanji printer. With its SX series of printers it has also competed in high-speed continuous-feed printers for the data center printing. A key strength is its proprietary controller, whose technology may also be used for languages that use two-byte characters. Canon hopes to leverage this capability first in China.

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