Posts tagged: Print On Demand

2013: A Turning Point for Inkjet in Production

Jim Hamilton
 Dec 10, 2013
Though inkjet has been a hot topic since 2008 (remember the ‘inkjet’ drupa?), it is hard to underestimate the continuing impact inkjet is having across all areas of the graphic arts. I think 2013 marks an interesting turning point. Inkjet is everywhere from document printing to labels & packaging to decorative to functional and 3D printing.

Gartner Hype Cycle

3D printing had to be one of the most talked about topics of 2013 and jetting technologies are the key behind many 3D printing implementations (though in this case they are jetting materials rather than inks). That being said, in my opinion 3D printing has reached what Gartner likes to call the ‘Peak of Inflated Expectations’ and others have described as ‘Irrational Exuberance.’ The way some people talk about 3D printing you’d think that before long you’ll be 3D printing your beer complete with the bottle (with a label on the outside and a cap on top).

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Indian Wedding Albums: Big Potential in a Growing Market

Lior Meron
 Mar 19, 2013

The Indian graphic arts market as a whole is fascinating and fast growing. However, there is one area of particular interest for digital printing: the wedding industry. According to recent research, there are around 12,000 weddings held every day in India and around 1.5 million photos are taken on each of these wedding days. All of these marriages have the potential to drive the production of multiple wedding albums and related photo merchandise.

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Print and Zombies

Jim Hamilton
 Nov 5, 2012

Somehow, zombies have crept into the debate about the value of print. Below are three recent examples of how print and zombies have been connected in some fashion on the Internet.

  1. Why Print Books Are Like Zombies — This blog is actually about digital rights management, but the point is that printed books live on and on (in your bookshelves, your attic, your basement, etc.). They never die. Nor can they be taken away from you by the publisher after you’ve bought them.
  2. Print Zombie — Is Print Dead? — This blog examines the future of print. It’s called Print Zombie because “Everyone knows if something dies, it just comes back stronger as a Zombie!”
  3. And my favorite: Print versus Digital — Who Survives the Zombies? — This imaginative and hilarious infographic provides compelling facts to support the theory that print is much better suited to survive a zombie attack.

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The Book Is the Web Site, and Vice Versa

Jim Hamilton
 Oct 22, 2009

As the print-on-demand book concept gains increasing acceptance, it strikes me that its popularity should solidify another interesting possibility: a book as a web site. What I mean by this is that a book should be available on the web in its entirety, not necessarily for free, perhaps sponsored by advertising or password protected for access only by a subscriber, but the source file for the book should be a web site. When new information is added or errors corrected, they should be immediately reflected in the book. The web site would be easily browsable and searchable while the book would represent the physical record, to be consumed at leisure without the need for an energy-consuming computer, mobile device, or e-reader. It would be readable in fifty, a hundred, or five hundred years. The web site would display its content dynamically to suit the real estate of the computer or mobile device screen while the book would benefit from typical book features such as headers, footers, page numbers, a table of contents, and an index. The printed book (or e-book) would be generated automatically only when an order was taken. The book’s content would reflect the latest version as reflected on the web site. The two would be one, and yet different.

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Amazon Loses Round 1 of Print-On Demand Book Lawsuit

Jim Hamilton
 Sep 2, 2009

On August 29th the U.S. District Court in Maine ruled on a motion to dismiss a class action suit brought by BookLocker.com against Amazon.com. BookLocker’s suit claims that Amazon violated federal anti-trust law by tying its own on-line book services with the printing services provided by BookSurge, its wholly owned subsidiary. Amazon had moved to dismiss BookLocker’s suit, but it will move forward except for one motion in its filing. This motion relates to an order “requiring full restitution of all funds acquired from Amazon’s unfair business practices, including disgorgement of revenues and/or profits.” Other parts of the motion that were allowed to move forward include “injunctive relief…enjoining Amazon from continuing or engaging in the unfair and anti-competitive activities”; “damages, penalties, and other monetary relief provided by the Clayton Act…including treble damages”; and the ability of the plaintiff to recover the costs of the lawsuit. Read more »

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