Posts tagged: magazine

A Transformative Separation: R.R. Donnelley to Split into Three Parts

Jim Hamilton
 Aug 6, 2015

As part of its investor presentation earlier this week, R.R. Donnelley announced plans to split into three publicly traded companies, each with a different focus. These companies will be Customized Multi-Channel Communications (CMCo), Financial Communications Services (FinancialCo), and Publishing & Retail-Centric Print (PRSCo). Describing the move as a “transformative separation,” R.R. Donnelley positions this as the next stage in the company’s evolution from a print & ship model to a multi-channel communication services model that leverages data analytics, content optimization, and multi-channel marketing. The transaction will take the form of a tax-free spin-off of the financial and publishing/retail components and is expected to be completed by the end of 2016. The customized multi-channel media communications component will retain R.R. Donnelley’s outstanding notes/debt and will receive cash proceeds from the sales of the two other components. Existing R.R. Donnelley shareholders will end up owning shares in all three companies. No specifics were provided in regard to the management teams for each component. That will come later.

Source: R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company Investor Presentation, August 4, 2015

R.R. Donnelley has net sales of about eleven and a half billion dollars. The three planned companies break out as follows: Read more »

Frankly Speaking: How does a magazine say goodbye after 128 years?

Frank Romano
 Aug 22, 2011

In 1967 the printing industry and its suppliers supported over 30 advertising-based magazines:

The nationals: Inland Printer/American Printer, Graphic Arts Monthly, Printing Impressions, Printing Production, Printing Magazine, and Modern Lithography.

The regionals: New England Printer, Southern Printer, Pacific Printer, Southern Printer, Printing Views (midwest), Printing News (New York), and Florida Printer

The inplants: Inplant Printer, Inplant Reproductions, The Office

Publishing: Editor & Publisher, Publishers Auxiliary (weeklies), American Press, Publisher’s Weekly, and Book Industry

The internationals: Canadian Printer, British Printer, El Arte Tipografico, Artes Graficas

The art magazines: Art Direction, Graphic Design USA, CA magazine

Other: Graphic Arts Product News, The Typographical Journal

Later on there were Quick Printer, MicroPublishing News, TypeWorld/Electronic Publishing, PRE-, and Publish.

Here is a collage of some of them that I made in 1967. Yes, I am a hoarder. Read more »

Converting Printing Plants into Data Centers – More Irony in the Publishing Industry

Jeff Hayes
 Apr 14, 2011

Earlier this month I/O Data Centers opened their latest modular data center facility at the former site of the New York Times printing plant in Edison, NJ. Apparently printing plants and paper mills have many characteristics that are desired for mega-sized data centers being constructed around the world. How ironic.

The New York Times Co. originally opened the state-of-the-art printing plant in 1992, less than one year after Tim Berners-Lee posted a short summary of the World Wide Web project he had been working on at CERN. Noted Berners-Lee in his post, “The WWW project merges the techniques of information retrieval and hypertext to make an easy but powerful global information system.”

Fast forward 16 years and the publisher announced it was shutting down the facility, reducing the size of the paper by one and a half inches and consolidating production operations at its College Point facility in Queens New York. Read more »

Esquire Expires

Other Posts
 Jun 30, 2009

 

Esquire E-Ink CoverLast October I picked up a copy of Esquire’s 75th Anniversary edition which featured an E-Ink electronic paper display embedded in the cover. With moving words and flashing images this experimental magazine cover was meant to attract attention and explore the possibilities surrounding electronic paper display technology and the publishing industry.

 

The magazine sat on my desk for a couple days and quickly attracted the attention of a few co-workers. Before long, we started an office pool — placing bets on the day that the magazine’s batteries would die and the display would expire.

 

According to Esquire.com, the electronics and batteries used for the E-Ink cover were manufactured in China, flown to Dallas, shipped in a refrigerated truck to Mexico where the covers were assembled by hand, and shipped back to Kentucky, home of one of R.R. Donnelly’s magazine printing plants. Retrofitted equipment was then used to bind the special covers to the rest of the magazine before it was distributed across the country. Esquire originally estimated that once activated, the batteries used to power the flashing E-Ink display would last 90 days. In actuality, my copy of Esquire magazine lived for nearly 250 days, exceeding my expectations and destroying my chance of winning the pool. The expiration of Esquire magazine got me thinking about the viability of electronic paper. Read more »

Is the thrill that’ll getcha when you get your [camera phone] picture on the cover of RollingStone

Carrie Sylvester
 Dec 4, 2008
Now that I’ve got you singing the good ‘ol tune from Dr. Hook (those old enough to remember it that is!clip), I’ll admit that I took some liberties… this article has nothing to do with a Rolling Stone cover. Instead, it is about a magazine (VodaWorld) published by an African mobile telecommunications
Summer Issue of VodaWorld being distributed this week
Summer Issue of VodaWorld being distributed this week

company, Vodacom, for its subscribers and service carriers. Although it’s not a magazine that reaches the masses, it has done something that to my knowledge has not been done before – it has used a camera phone photo as its cover shot. Okay, it’s no Rolling Stone, but 1.2 million copies of this magazine are distributed on a quarterly basis.  

According to an article found on the African BIZcommunity.com site, the cover of the latest issue of Vodaworld magazine was shot using a commercially available camera phone, the Sony Ericsson C905 (8.1 MP) Cyber-shot. “The resolution of camera phones has reached the level where they’re no longer gimmicky; they’re real cameras,” states Andrew October, editor of the magazine. (Note: This camera phone is not available in the United States.)

 

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