Posts tagged: Kindle

Frankly Speaking: Bi-textual

Frank Romano
 Jan 2, 2013

Today I purchased the e-version of the last print issue of Newsweek magazine. Oxymoronic? Or just moronic?

As tablet computers proliferate, and we are Nooked and Kindled and iPadded and even Andrioded to death, the ease and convenience of acquiring content touches more and more people. As someone who passes through train and bus stations a lot, I see tablets everywhere. I assume that they are also at airports. A few diehards have laptops but tablets are omnipresent.

And it is not generational. From kids to seniors, e-gadgets are age-independent. Read more »

Amazon Lights the Kindle Fire

Alan Bullock
 Sep 29, 2011

The tablet market got a little more crowded this week. What remains to be seen is whether the top 80% or the bottom 20% feels the squeeze, or if maybe the whole pie gets bigger to make room for a new player. Amazon’s entry had been widely anticipated and predicted to be a potential “iPad killer”. The announcement of the Amazon Kindle Fire, a 7-inch Android device with an aggressive $199 price point, made headlines on Wednesday, but measuring it against the iPad may be comparing apples to, um, Apples. Read more »

Digital vs. Print … Publishing Industry Tipping Point Revisited

Jeff Hayes
 Apr 21, 2011

Last summer I wrote a blog suggesting the publishing industry may soon reach a tipping point – a point at which the industry accelerates towards a digital business model and away from a print-based model. Recent financial results from Amazon.com, Gannett, The New York Times, and Apple provide further evidence that the industry is closer to that point.

Books

You probably recall last summer Amazon.com announced for the first time it was selling more Kindle and e-books than hardcover books. In its full year 2010 financial results Amazon.com disclosed some other amazing statistics: Read more »

On Demand Printing, Bankruptcy, and iPads – Irony and Innovation

Jeff Hayes
 Feb 16, 2011

Yesterday, Xerox announced that it is ready to ship its Espresso Book Machine which can print books on demand at retail locations like your corner book store. Today, as reported in the Wall Street Journal, Borders Group — the second largest U.S. chain of retail book stores — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Are these two items related? Probably not, but I see some irony in the timing of the announcements.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

The Espresso Book Machine is supposed to be a liberator of content, a new revenue stream for traditional brick & mortar bookstores, a solution for the busy consumer that wants a hard copy book. Just install one of these machines and watch the customers come in and print their own books on demand. Xerox proclaims, “Self-publishers can print their latest manuscripts at the corner bookstore, classical books are now available for purchase on demand at libraries, cruise-goers can leave their books at home and print reading materials on the ship.”

The reality is that the number of bookstores has been dropping steadily as buyers shift to on-line purchasing through Amazon.com and other sites.  Why? e-Commerce is a more efficient business model with a better value proposition for most consumers. Read more »

Frankly Speaking: The Dead CD-ROM

Frank Romano
 Jan 14, 2011

Things change. Especially recorded media things. Remember floppy disks of all sizes, Zip disks, Syquest disks, and MO disks?

Then there was the Compact Disc, an optical disc used to store digital data. It was originally developed to store and playback audio recordings exclusively, but later expanded to encompass data storage. CDs have been commercially available since 1982. Read more »

Digital vs. Print: Tipping Point for the Publishing Industry?

Jeff Hayes
 Jul 20, 2010

There were several interesting announcements in the publishing industry yesterday that have me thinking deeply about the future of print and digital content.

Books

In the book industry, Amazon.com announced some startling figures related to its Kindle and e-book sales.

  • Amazon.com is now selling more e-books than hardcover books. Over the past three months, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 143 Kindle books. (The ratio is 100 to 180 over the last month!) These figures are across Amazon.com’s entire U.S. book business and include sales of hardcover books where there is no Kindle edition. Free Kindle books are excluded and if included would make the number even higher.
  • Amazon sold more than 3x as many Kindle books in the first half of 2010 as in the first half of 2009. During this period Amazon lowered the price of the Kindle to $189 from $259 (27% reduction).
  • The Association of American Publishers’ latest data reports that e-book sales grew 207% year-to-date through May. Kindle book sales through May exceeded that growth rate.

Read more »

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