Posts tagged: functional printing

Konica Minolta Announces Next Generation High Resolution, High Speed MEMS Printheads

Ron Gilboa
 Jul 27, 2015

Konica Minolta, a long time innovator in inkjet technology with over 30 years of experience, has released information on a new generation of print heads aimed at the evolving graphic arts, industrial, and functional printing markets. These printheads have resolution as high as 1,200 nozzles per inch (npi), drop size as low as 3 picoliters, jetting frequency of up to 100 kHz, and a physical size that is significantly smaller than the previous generation of Konica Minolta heads. As with many print head manufacturers Konica Minolta is manufacturing these printhead using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication. Konica Minolta’s high precision printhead is capable of jetting of a range of inks and functional materials such as resins. These new capabilities will enable innovative new products in a range of industries. Konica Minolta expects to begin mass production of these heads in the spring of 2016. Read more »

Highlights of the Online Print Symposium 2014 in Munich

David Stabel
 May 20, 2014


On May 15th/16th 2014 the second Online Print Symposium was held in Munich, Germany. The slogan of this years’ event: „E-Business Print: Trends, Markets, Practices“. The Online Print Symposium is jointly organized by the Fogra Forschungsgesellschaft e.V., zipcon consulting GmbH, and the Bundesverband Druck und Medien e.V. and acts as a platform to discuss the latest industry developments in the field of e-commerce and print within the so-called D-A-CH region (Germany, Austria and Switzerland). InfoTrends was invited to attend the first day of this symposium, which attracted around 150 participants from within different parts of the industry.  Here are some key impressions of that day.

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Screen Updates Press and Customers on its Digital Strategy

Ron Gilboa
 Oct 25, 2013

Screen USA hosted a two-day open house in its facilities in Rolling Meadows, IL. (Near Chicago) this past week and provided an update on three key digital printing products: the Truepress JetSX, the Truepress Jet L350UV, and the Truepress Jet3200UV.

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Frankly Speaking: Paper Will be the New Gold

Frank Romano
 Jul 12, 2013

As paper volumes drop because of electronic substitution, and paper mills cut capacity to sync with demand, paper will become a rare commodity. And rare commodities are worth a lot of money.

I would start hoarding paper now instead of gold and silver. Some day, we will have new denominations based on sheets, reams, cases, and of course, rolls of paper. It may not be uncommon to hear “Can I Read more »

Home printed car parts and toys, still a dream!

Ron Gilboa
 Jun 10, 2013

A recent article in The Wall Street Journal this week discussed 3D Printing by companies such as Ford, General Electrics, and Mattel. The article was also accompanied by a video interview with Ford’s Harold Sears, 3D printing specialist at Ford who provided insights on the use of 3D printing at his facility.

In the article, the three companies discussed their long time use of 3D printing to make prototypes, molds, and even finished products using 3D technology. Key drivers for 3D printing at these companies are the ability to produce accurate parts faster than traditional fabrication methods, and reduced costs. These stories highlight this common theme but also one other–that manufacturers have good reasons to be against the “printing” of their parts or even whole products. Read more »

Xerox Poised to Revolutionize Electronic Chip Manufacturing

Ron Gilboa
 Apr 15, 2013

A science article in the New York Times by John Markoff last week detailed an innovation from Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) that could revolutionize the world of chip manufacturing.  In a new manufacturing process from Xerox PARC, slivers of silicone called “chiplets” are immersed in a carrier liquid and are then “printed” onto a solid carrier material, much as toner particles are managed today in laser printing via Fluidic Self Assembly (FSA). Following Xerox’s rich heritage of innovation from the 1970s such as laser printing, Ethernet, the modern personal computer, graphical user interface (GUI), object-oriented programming, ubiquitous computing, amorphous silicon (a-Si) applications, and advancing very-large-scale-integration (VLSI) for semiconductors, printed chiplets  could possibly surpass these. Chiplet technology has the potential to revolutionize conventional manufacturing of chips and other microelectronic components, a change that will give benefits in flexibility, timeliness, and efficiency for companies that make such products.

The image below provides an enlarged view of the chiplets, each no larger than a grain of sand. Using systems that are essentially laser printer, Xerox’s PARC may one day be able to create desktop manufacturing plants that use chiplets to “print” the circuitry for a wide array of electronic devices.

Source:  Amy Sullivan/PARC
An enlarged view of small slivers of silicon, each no larger than a grain of sand, called chiplets. Using laser printers, Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center may one day be able to create desktop manufacturing plants that use chiplets to “print” the circuitry for a wide array of electronic devices.
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Frankly Speaking: New Print

Frank Romano
 Jul 11, 2012

At drupa 2012, a number of companies brought up the subjects of printed electronics, functional printing, and industrial printing. In most cases, these new print methods and markets went beyond traditional promotional and document printing, which is mostly reproduced on paper and paperboard substrates. Let’s try to understand this new market:

Printed electronics is based on conductive or optical inks deposited on a substrate, creating active or passive devices. It will create very low-cost electronics for flexible displays, smart labels and packaging, animated posters, active clothing, and components in other products. The printing of electronics can use traditional printing methods for depositing special inks on material, using screen printing, flexography, gravure, offset lithography, and inkjet. There are still significant technical hurdles to printing RFID circuitry and chips.

Functional printing is the deposition of a printable substance that Read more »

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