Posts tagged: film

Prepare for the Fourth Imaging Wave

Ed Lee
 Sep 14, 2017

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Excerpt from Digital Imaging Reporter’s State of the Industry 2017

Analog film, the first wave of photography, lasted more than 150 years, with over 1.5 trillion photos captured worldwide during this timeframe. In the 1990s, digital cameras kicked off the second wave: digital photography. Smartphones were introduced in the late 2000s, marking the third wave: mobile imaging.

Always-connected smartphones and social networks have changed how people take and share photos and videos. Mobile imaging is led by companies with no background in photography, such as Apple, Samsung, Facebook, Instagram and Snap.

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Leveraging Kodak Flexo Technology to Print Touch-screen Sensors

Jim Hamilton
 Sep 25, 2015

In a huge manufacturing building in the Eastman Business Park in Rochester, New York, Kodak is printing sensors that can be used in touch screens for tablets, computer screens, kiosks, and industrial equipment. The process uses technologies that print service providers will find familiar, but they are being used to achieve a very different end result.

First, a series of flexographic plates are imaged on a modified Creo square-spot plate imager. Each plate has a repetitive design of extremely thin parallel lines. The plates are mounted on a modified roll-fed flexographic press that prints with a catalytic ink on both sides of a roll of clear plastic (similar to the material used for motion picture film). The catalytic ink provides a receptive surface for the next step, in which the printed roll of plastic is immersed in a bath with a copper fluid solution. In that bath, copper is applied to the thin printed lines of catalytic ink. The copper is what makes the resulting print conductive, and that’s why you can make touch screens with this printed component. A darkening agent is applied on top of the copper, and the rolls are then cut into sheets containing the functionally printed sensor that will ultimately go into a touch-screen display. This printed grid of thin, crisscrossing lines is virtually invisible, yet it provides the underlying conductive foundation that is able to sense when someone puts a finger on a touch-sensitive screen.

Kodak touch-screen sensor (showing a magnified view of the touch-sensitive grid)

Today Kodak is printing working production samples that can be tested by prospects who may one day Read more »

The Reality of 4K

Ed Lee
 Apr 22, 2014

Once again, the major theme of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show was 4K — from capture to workflow to transmit and display. With each passing year, 4K gets a little closer to becoming reality.

I was asked many times at the show “Is 4K for real?” and “Will it become mainstream?”

Is it time to just call it “photography” again?

Alan Bullock
 Feb 15, 2013

It has been more than 35 years since Kodak engineer Steve Sasson built what is widely regarded as the first digital camera, and nearly 18 years since Apple introduced the Kodak-built QuickTake 100, the first sub-$1,000 digital camera. For several years, it was important to note which cameras were digital and which prints were made from an image captured by a “digital camera,” often to explain away any image quality differences versus “real cameras” that still used film.

Much has changed since then. Film is but a distant memory for nearly everyone — except those who don’t remember it at all. Digital cameras are real cameras and digital photos are real photos, but for some reason the industry (InfoTrends included) continues to use the terms “digital camera” and “digital photography,” as if to differentiate them from something with which they would be easily confused. Read more »

100,000 Photos and Counting

Ed Lee
 Aug 30, 2012

Japanese Tea Garden San Francisco (August 1999, Kodak DC210 Zoom camera, 0.3 MP)

Earlier this summer I captured my 100,000th digital photograph. In 1999 when I saved my first digital photo I would never had thought that over the next 13 years I would amass such a large collection of photos. Back in 1999, that number would have been almost unimaginable. To get to 100,000 film images would have required shooting about 2,800 — 4,200 rolls of 36 or 24 exposure film. At a cost of around $15 per roll for film and processing I would have spent $42,000 – $60,000 to accomplish this. These numbers are staggering.

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In the News – July 29th

Other Posts
 Jul 29, 2011

InfoTrends is frequently asked to provide quotes and data for leading news outlets. Here are just some of the recent stories that InfoTrends information has been featured in: Read more »

In the News – July 15th

Other Posts
 Jul 15, 2011

InfoTrends is frequently asked to provide quotes and data for leading news outlets. Here are just some of the recent stories that InfoTrends information has been featured in: Read more »

Goodbye APS film. We hardly got to know you.

Ed Lee
 Jul 8, 2011

When it was introduced in 1996, APS (Advanced Photo System) film was supposed to herald the future of film photography. Just a short 15 years later, its epitaph is being written. Smaller and lighter 35mm point and shoot film cameras dampened APS film’s early days, and now affordable, high-quality compact digital cameras have taken the steam completely out of this market.

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