Posts tagged: e-book

Take the 15 Page a Day Challenge!

Eve Padula
 Oct 2, 2017

The proliferation of social media makes it possible for consumers and businesses to spread the word about events, causes, and pretty much anything faster than ever before. Over the past few years, we’ve seen quite a few social media challenges. Back In 2014, the Ice Bucket Challenge increased awareness about ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) while also raising $109 million for the charity. During 2016, the Mannequin Challenge became a social media sensation. Not to be outdone, the Paper and Packaging Board issued its own How Life Unfolds challenge of its own over the summer. This 15 Pages a Day Challenge is a paper-based reading program that’s great for people of all ages and literacy levels.

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New InfoTrends Study Shows that Electronic and Printed Products have a Future Together

David Haueter
 May 2, 2014

It’s safe to say that electronic viewing and sharing of photos is here to stay as the use of smartphones and tablets become a more prevalent part of our photography habits. What’s more of a wild card is how electronic “e-books” and “e-cards” will ultimately impact the print side of the market. Recent research by InfoTrends suggests that there is room for both, and that the print side of the market may even get a boost from the electronic world.

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Electronic cards and books having an impact on print, but it doesn’t need to be that way

David Haueter
 Mar 20, 2014

With the rise of smartphones and tablets as well as the popularity of sites like Facebook and Tumblr, we’re becoming more and more a world where our photos are shared electronically. We’ve been seeing for years the impact this has had on the traditional photo print market, but the trend toward electronic viewing may be extending into the market for photo products like cards and books as well.

In our 2013 U.S. Photo Merchandise Survey, 23% of respondents said they had created electronic photo cards (e-cards) in the last year and 17% said they had created electronic photo books (e-books).  Not surprisingly, the percentage of e-card and e-book buyers was highest among the 18 to 24 and 25 to 34 year old age groups, as well as those that said they were “advanced hobbyist” photographers (for example, 39% of advanced hobbyists said they had created e-cards in last year, compared to just 22% of snapshot photographers).

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The Biggest Day of the Year for Newspaper Inserts

Jim Hamilton
 Nov 25, 2011

Thanksgiving morning I go out to get the newspaper, which normally can be found midway up the driveway where the delivery guy heaves it from the street. To my amazement, it’s sitting on my doorstep and I do a doubletake because it looks suspiciously like the Sunday paper. It’s humongous. As I pick it up I see why it wasn’t thrown. It’s oozing with inserts and weighs a ton. The delivery guy would have separated his shoulder if he had thrown it. I bring it inside, groggily checking the wall calendar to be sure that it’s Thursday (not Sunday). It soon dawns on me that tomorrow is Black Friday, the biggest retail shopping day of the year, and therefore Thanksgiving, when most people have time to settle in with a newspaper and its advertisements, is most probably the biggest day of the year for newspaper insert printers.

Black Friday newspaper inserts from the Boston Globe

Black Friday newspaper inserts from the Boston Globe

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BookStats Fills a Gap with New U.S. Publishing Data

Other Posts
 Aug 25, 2011

Ever since the Book Industry Study Group (BISG) stopped compiling market data in 2009, the publishing industry has experienced a dearth of sources for detailed, industry-specific statistics.  The BISG, in collaboration with the Association of American Publishers (AAP) is looking to rectify that with the recent publication of their new U.S. publishing industry statistical report entitled BookStats .

BookStats, released on August 9th, 2011 provides data estimates for the publishing industry from 2008 to 2010 and covers different industry sub segments including the K-12 school, higher education, trade, professional, and scholarly markets. BookStats was compiled from data supplied by 1,963 different publishers , which included companies of different sizes and market sectors. Read more »

Take a Free Book and Pass It Along: The Concord Free Press Story

Other Posts
 Jul 28, 2011

Book lovers face two major problems: 1) new books can be relatively expensive and 2) they take up a lot of space. E-readers have solved the second problem, but not the first and have driven down the demand for hard copies of books in the process. A publisher in Concord, Massachusetts has come up with an innovative way to solve both problems using hard copies of books, while also promoting the work of authors, and driving charitable donations. Read more »

The Simple Joy of Reading a Great… Computer

Eve Padula
 Apr 4, 2011

I’ve always been an avid reader, but I don’t always find as much time as I’d like to sit back and read a good book. Last week, I took a relaxing vacation and rediscovered my love of literature.

Years ago, I recall a rather forward-thinking teacher telling my sixth grade class that people would someday do all of their reading on computers.

“I don’t like that idea,” my friend instantly objected. “You can’t curl up with a computer!” Of course, my classmate was quite right at the time–the computers of yesteryear were big, noisy, and barely transportable. Those computers had to be placed on a desk or table, and they also required access to an electrical outlet. Read more »

Bad News for Independent Book Stores

Jim Hamilton
 Jan 2, 2011

In December the Minneapolis Star Tribune published an article called “Local bookstores fall to ‘e-book revolution’” about how the combined impact of the economy and the Internet had resulted in the recent closing of four independent book stores in Minnesota. Probably the most depressing aspect in an overall depressing story was the following quote from a representative from one of the bookstores who said, “We’re really now a showroom for books.” What she means is that after browsing in the store, most people then either go home and buy the book on-line or avoid the print version of the book entirely and purchase the e-book. Read more »

Where does the future of media lie: printed or electronic?

Ralf Schlozer
 Aug 2, 2010

Media tycoon Robert Murdoch announced last year that he wants to charge for online content of his publications. The Times in the U.K. made the move to charge for site content a few weeks ago. Experian, a company tracking web hits recorded a decline of 66% after introducing the paywall, as measured by the Times’ share of web hits of all media companies. Hits have seen further slight decline but started to stabilise. Competitor UK newspaper The Guardian took the analysis a step further and found that all non-registered surfers were forwarded to a sign-in page and that only 25.6% signed up there and proceeded to the originally targeted Times page. Taking into account free pre-registration of subscribers of the printed issue The Guardian concludes that the Times online lost overall 90% of its traffic. Actually this is pretty much in the range of what was predicted by the Sunday Times’ editor. It could even be worse in the future. Currently The Times is running a low cost trial subscription of just £1.00 for 30 days, instead of £2.00 per week as planned. On top there is a hefty reduction in on-line advertising revenues, as these are calculated by the actual views made by consumers. It does not help that Murdoch’s newspaper titles did pull out of the voluntary page view auditing for news sites – somebody stopping in reporting numbers is usually not a good sign.

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The iPad and the saviour of the publishing industry

Ralf Schlozer
 Jan 29, 2010

Steve Jobs can be sure of at least one success and that is the instant domination of all blogs around the world with one product launch. There have been many things stipulated, but I would like to get back on the influence the iPad could have on the publishing industry. There are remarks abound, about the great opportunity the iPad poses to publishers. But it should be spelled out explicitly: Steve Jobs is not interested in saving the publishing industry. He wants to sell iGadgets including software and everything around it. What will publishers gain?

Let’s have a look at the numbers: Assuming a consumer buys an iPad for publishing products it means a one-off fee of $500 and then every month an additional $30 (the web access charge) less to spend on publishing products. This money goes into the pockets of Apple and the network provider. Of course a consumer will expect a huge discount in return for the publishing content he reads on the iPad. That is the money the publisher is not getting. Sure, the publisher is saving money by producing e-content. Printing is only a small fraction though, about a seventh of the retail price. The biggest cost factor though is the retail channel which typically receives up to 50% of retail price. However this is the portion Amazon or iBooks are vying for and what they are already charging. In the end there will not be a lot of margin left after giving consumers the discounts they expect.

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