Posts tagged: Digital photo printing

Amazon Enters Photo Print Market

David Haueter
 Sep 29, 2016

There haven’t been that many significant entries into the photo print market over the last several years, so it was especially notable when Amazon announced its AmazonPrints service on September 21st, which is available to Amazon Prime and Amazon Drive customers. The service is now offering photo prints in 4” x 6” ($0.09), 5” x 7” ($0.58) and 8” x 10” ($1.79) sizes, as well as two different types of photo books. AmazonPrints 8” x 11” hardcover photo book with glossy pages starts at $19.99, and an 8” x 11” premium layflat hardcover book with matte paper starts at $44.99. According to the AmazonPrints website, stationery and calendars are coming soon.

Amazon logo

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Fujifilm opens “Wonder Photo Shop” in the heart of New York City

David Haueter
 Jul 19, 2016

On Friday July 22nd, Fujifilm will open the new “Wonder Photo Shop” at 176 5th Avenue in the shadow of the famous Flatiron Building in New York City. The New York City shop is the first U.S. location and the ninth storefront in the world.  The first shop was established in Tokyo in 2014, with other shops located in Barcelona, Bogata, Manila, Shanghai, and Singapore. After attending a media event just a few days before the store opened, I’m confident that New Yorkers will embrace the shop and that it will fulfill one of Fujifilm’s goals, which is for people to become more immersed in the joy of photography.

Wonder Photo Shop gets ready to open

Wonder Photo Shop gets ready to open

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More Education is Key to Smartphone Photo Printing

David Haueter
 Dec 22, 2015

Smartphones are wonderful devices and it’s hard to imagine life without them now. I think it’s safe to say that many consumers don’t use anywhere near the full capabilities of their smartphones, and this is especially true when it comes to photo printing. It’s a simple fact that most consumers are now using their smartphones as their primary camera. In the recently published InfoTrends 2015 U.S. Photo Printing Study, 63% of survey respondents said they use a smartphone most often as their primary camera, compared to 20% who use a digital point & shoot camera most often.

Smartphones have great potential to boost the photo printing market, as the smartphone can essentially act as a photo kiosk. The problem is that even though most of the leading retailers and online photo service providers have apps available for photo printing and output, many consumers don’t really know how to go about ordering prints from their smartphone, or even making quality photo prints on their own home printer from the device. When respondents to the U.S. Photo Printing Study who have not printed smartphone photos were asked why not, the leading response (at over 34%) was, “I don’t know how.” Over 15% said it was “too difficult” and over 12% said their phone “didn’t support printing.”

Phone slide nn

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Encouraging Signs in Mobile Photo Printing

David Haueter
 Jul 2, 2015

It’s become clear over the last couple of years that the future success or failure of the photo output market relies heavily on how much consumers decide to print from their mobile devices. Smartphones have become the primary camera for most consumers and there’s no sign of that changing as the photography capabilities of these devices evolve and get better with each new generation. The potential for these devices to generate photo print orders is huge with the sheer numbers of them that will be used for photography and the growing number of photos people are taking from their smartphones, but that doesn’t mean people will print from them.

InfoTrends recently completed our 2015 U.S. Mobile Imaging Study, which gives some insight into what consumers are doing now and planning to do when it comes to ordering photo prints from their mobile phones. We asked a series of questions on respondent’s behavior when ordering prints from mobile phones, including the question “Have you ever printed your mobile phone photos directly from your mobile phone?” The results show that 27% have “tried it and will do it again,” while 7% said they “have tried it and won’t do it again.” Another 27% simply have no interest, but it’s encouraging for the print market that 23% of respondents said they “plan to but haven’t tried it yet,” while another 16% said they “didn’t realize they could print mobile phone photos, but would like to.”

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To protect your most important photos, you need to print them

David Haueter
 Feb 27, 2015

It’s a simple fact that many people have no plan in place for protecting their digital photos. Despite all the good things that digital technology has brought us, it hasn’t really made preserving photos any easier. Things were much simpler back in the film days – you dropped off a roll of film at your local retailer and you got back a print of everything on the film roll, often in duplicate. The best photos would usually be placed into a photo album while the others usually ended up in a shoebox under the bed or in a closet. One of my favorite things to do when I was growing up was to pull my Grandmother’s photo albums off her shelf and look at pictures that went back decades of her and my Grandfather as much younger people and of my Dad as a kid.

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Snapfish Drives Mobile Photo Print Ordering by Giving Away Free Prints for a Year

David Haueter
 Jun 13, 2014

Giving away free photo prints is very common in the photo industry. The top retailers and online sites typically offer free print promotions a few times during the year, and many give away free prints just for signing up to be a member of their respective sites. The goal of these promotions is to get consumers to print more, of course, but they also serve as a platform to promote higher-priced products like photo books, cards, calendars and canvas prints that have stronger profit margins.

One key trend that will dramatically affect the output market in general and the print in particular over the next few years is the growing use of smartphones as primary cameras. People are taking more photos than ever thanks to these devices, so the potential is there for the print market to get a much needed boost from their use. With the ease with which photos can be shared electronically from these devices, there is also the potential for print to decline because people may rely on viewing, sharing and archiving their photos electronically instead of with prints.

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Where Did the Family Photo Album Go?

David Haueter
 Feb 6, 2014

It’s only logical that photo books would displace traditional photo albums for many people. After all, a photo book is nothing more than a book with photos printed on the pages, rather than a photo album with prints slid into plastic sleeves. Photo books, of course, also allow for personalization through the adding of text, as well as choices of backgrounds, borders and various binding options.

In the 2013 U.S. Photo Printing Survey, survey respondents that had purchased photo books were asked if they thought photo books would eventually replace traditional photo albums in their households. Interestingly, over 33% said that photo books had already started replacing photo albums and another 30% said that they plan to start printing photo books instead of putting prints in traditional albums. Only 19% said “no.” Those with higher incomes were more likely to already have photo books replace albums in the home, as were those who said they are “early adopters” of technology.

 

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Camera Phones/Smartphones may Bolster Photo Print Market

David Haueter
 May 23, 2012

There is concern in the photo industry that the migration from digital still cameras to camera phones/smartphones and their increased usage will lead to fewer photos being printed. The concern is valid, as camera phones/smartphones provide an easy on-ramp for photos to be sent to online sites, which could potentially take print completely out of the viewing and sharing process.

We believe that for the near term the opposite will be true; that increased camera phone/smartphone usage will actually lead to more prints being generated. The rationale behind our thinking is that as more people rely on their camera phones/smartphones as everyday cameras and even use them more for special events, that a growing percentage of these photos will be important photos that they will want to share, preserve, or display as prints.

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Digital Photography and Photo Printing: Moms Rock!

Eve Padula
 May 9, 2012

Just in time for Mother’s Day on May 13th, InfoTrends has released two reports exploring how motherhood affects digital photography and photo printing habits. InfoTrends’ research has long confirmed that mothers are generally more photo-active than other demographic groups. They typically capture, print, and share more of their photos, likely because so many of these photos feature their children.

InfoTrends’ report entitled Motherhood’s Striking Impact on Digital Photography and Photo Printing Habits provides a direct comparison between moms aged 18 to 29 and non-moms within the same age range. In comparing moms and non-moms, we were able to garner additional insight about how non-mothers’ photography behaviors might change as more of them become parents in the future.

In relation to non-moms under the age of 30, moms within the same age range:

  • Use their cameras more frequently: Nearly 68% of moms use their digital cameras multiple times each week, compared to 37% of non-moms.
  • Capture over 50% more photos: Moms report capturing over 198 digital camera photos in a typical three-month period. The average among non-moms was 125.5.
  • Print about twice as many photos: Moms print nearly 54 digital camera photos during a typical 3-month period, compared to about 24 photos for non-moms.

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Facebook Announces Agreement to Buy Instagram

David Haueter
 Apr 10, 2012

Facebook will be making the largest acquisition in its history when it acquires the incredibly popular Instagram photo app, a deal which was announced on Monday and should be completed in this quarter. Facebook has agreed to pay approximately $1 billion in cash and stock for Instagram, which has gained around 30 million users since it launched in January 2011. Instagram doesn’t have any significant sources of revenue, but reportedly closed a deal for $50 million in funding just last week (at a $500 million valuation — hello instant payoff!). Facebook will also acquire Instagram’s entire team of employees in the deal, which only consists of around a dozen people in the San Francisco area. Read more »

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