Posts tagged: Consumer

Everyday Video Going Mobile

Carrie Sylvester
 Feb 8, 2013


In the ‘60s it was your favorite Uncle who had the fancy Super8 video camera. The ‘80s brought us the “luggable” VHS camcorder, the ‘90s saw smaller digital camcorders that could record to compact video tapes, and the 2000s made a move to internal or flash memory. Present day finds the traditional camcorder being displaced by smaller and more convenient mobile phones and digital cameras. Will these pocketable devices replace camcorders?

In the 2012 InfoTrends Video End User survey asked what cameras people were using to shoot video and then more specifically what they use most often for shooting everyday videos. Read more »

Changes in the imaging landscape means changes to InfoTrends’ consumer services in Europe

Other Posts
 Dec 6, 2012

InfoTrends is pleased to announce some exciting changes to our European Consumer Information Services. As of Monday, 3rd December, InfoTrends’ introduced two new services: Photo Capture Trends Europe and Photo Output Trends Europe. Read more »

144 Digital Cameras and Counting

Carrie Sylvester
 Oct 5, 2012

As part of the InfoTrends’ Digital Photography Trends service, we keep a close eye on new camera introductions. 2012 has already seen a good number of new cameras, 144 to be exact, and the year is only three-quarters through. Before the bustle of Q4/holiday announcements come out, we thought it would be a good time to give a little review of what is happening in the market so far.

Q1-Q3 Highlights

  • CILCs (compact interchangeable lens cameras) – All major camera manufacturers (Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax & Olympus) have introduced new compact interchangeable lens cameras (CILCs).
  • Smart cameras — Nikon and Samsung introduced “smart cameras” — Nikon with their Coolpix S800c and Samsung with the Galaxy cameras, both running the Android operating system coupled with built-in Wi-Fi. This marks the first real effort to create and deliver cameras that act like our smartphones. Will these be the “must have” cameras? Nikon and Samsung sure hope so.
  • Larger image sensors — One way that digital camera manufacturers are  differentiating themselves from their smartphone competition is with larger image sensors. Sony, Canon and Fujifilm have all introduced compact cameras with larger image sensors. SLRs are also getting image sensor improvements, with both Canon and Nikon introducing new models featuring a larger, full-size image sensor at price points that are well under those of previous full-frame SLR’s. These camera vendors are hoping that these new and improved sensors will resonate with consumers, and they should be a popular choice for enthusiast photographers that want higher resolution and better low-light capability at a lower price. If these types of cameras sell well, it won’t be long until other vendors introduce similar cameras to compete.

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Connectivity and Intelligence Are the Keys to the Future

Ed Lee
 Sep 12, 2012

Excerpt from Photo Industry Reporter’s State of the Industry 2012

The imaging industry has entered the Connected Era where consumer behavior and expectations are primarily driven by smart devices and online services. Consumer spending is being diverted from traditional digital cameras and photo prints to smartphones, tablets, apps, and social media. To stay relevant, traditional camera companies and photo print service providers need to align themselves with the forces of mobility, social media, apps, and cloud services.

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When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Rugged

Carrie Sylvester
 May 11, 2012

Cameras are facing tough competition from ever-present camera phones. It can be difficult for a new point & shoot camera to attract attention in a sea of smartphone and tablet introductions. Fortunately, digital camera vendors can stand out by introducing new models with sought-after features like rugged, go-anywhere construction, and connectivity. In the InfoTrends’ 2011 Digital Camera End-User Study, respondents were presented with current and futuristic camera features and asked to rank the importance of each feature. Connectivity and waterproof capabilities were two of the more interesting features that respondents cited. This week, Olympus and Fujifilm introduced new camera models that address these demands. Read more »

Channelpartner.de claims Samsung is launching inkjet printers with Kodak technology

Christine Dunne Dunne
 Apr 25, 2012

According to an article on channelpartner.de, Samsung is launching their first inkjet printers this week; although they will have Samsung’s own design and features they will use Kodak’s inkjet technology. Channelpartner.de received the news from the retail community, which is claiming that the Samsung consumer inkjet devices have already hit the shelves. Read more »

The Positives and Negatives of Kodak’s Exit from the Capture Devices Business

Ed Lee
 Feb 10, 2012

On February 9, 2012, to the surprise of no one, Kodak announced that by the middle of the year it would close its capture devices business, which includes digital cameras, pocket camcorders, and digital photo frames. The Kodak name will likely remain in the market through the licensing of the brand name to others to put on camera, camcorders, and photo frames. The company expects to save more than $100 million annually and according to Kodak, up to 400 employees may be affected. Moving forward, Kodak will focus its consumer facing efforts on home, online, and retail photo printing.

How should the market view this news? Here are our thoughts on some of the effects of this news.

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Is the Enterprise ready for Open Source?

Other Posts
 Aug 2, 2011

Stuck in a proprietary software-heavy mentality, enterprises do not typically rely on open source software (OSS) within their business. Yet arguing whether OSS or proprietary software is best for an organization is usually done in vain, as it largely depends on an organization’s needs, their comfort levels in implementing customized applications, and what they want to accomplish with the software (similar to how the debate around cloud computing and server-based software has evolved). All these different types of software implementation strategies cater to different requirements within an enterprise.

But over the past few years, we’ve seen OSS and the cloud become much more dominant on a consumer and SMB level thanks to Android, a sluggish economy, and the dependency of anywhere, anytime access of information. And as the consumerization of IT continues to infiltrate and transform the way organizations run their business, will enterprises who rely on proprietary software and on-premise applications inevitably transition to OSS and the cloud? Read more »

The value of a photo? How about $2.3 million!

Ed Lee
 Jun 28, 2011

There is an ongoing debate about the value of a photograph. It’s been stated as recently as the 6Sight Imaging Conference in San Jose, CA, June 21-22, that the value of a photo is at its highest point right after it is taken and then its value declines rapidly. So, print vendors and retailers need to get consumers to print their photos as soon as possible. However, we’ve said that at some point in time the trend can reverse itself and a photo can increase in value as the image becomes a historic memory. In most cases, it will not exceed its initial value, but there are exceptions. Read more »

Digital Photo Frames Lose their Luster

Ed Lee
 Jun 15, 2011

Just a few years ago, the digital photo frame was the star of the imaging industry. But the luster has worn off rather quickly. A number of factors have led to the passing of the baton. Some include: alternative methods for viewing photos becoming available, digital photo frames not making it past the gifting stage, and updating content on the frame takes work.

Read more »

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