Posts tagged: Amazon.com

Amazon Enters Photo Print Market

David Haueter
 Sep 29, 2016

There haven’t been that many significant entries into the photo print market over the last several years, so it was especially notable when Amazon announced its AmazonPrints service on September 21st, which is available to Amazon Prime and Amazon Drive customers. The service is now offering photo prints in 4” x 6” ($0.09), 5” x 7” ($0.58) and 8” x 10” ($1.79) sizes, as well as two different types of photo books. AmazonPrints 8” x 11” hardcover photo book with glossy pages starts at $19.99, and an 8” x 11” premium layflat hardcover book with matte paper starts at $44.99. According to the AmazonPrints website, stationery and calendars are coming soon.

Amazon logo

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Digital Interchangeable Lens Cameras Well-Positioned Worldwide

Ed Lee
 Jan 6, 2012

According to InfoTrends’ latest Worldwide Digital Camera forecast, digital interchangeable lens cameras (DILCs) sales were strong last year and are expected to continue to sell well over the next 5 years.

Over the holiday break, we visited each of the Amazon.com websites (U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan and China) to do an informal poll to see how popular Digital SLRs (DSLR) and Compact Interchangeable Lens Cameras (CILC) were for Amazon.com shoppers. The websites shows the 100 most popular cameras sold and updates the list hourly. Camera body only and various kit configurations are counted separately.

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The Biggest Day of the Year for Newspaper Inserts

Jim Hamilton
 Nov 25, 2011

Thanksgiving morning I go out to get the newspaper, which normally can be found midway up the driveway where the delivery guy heaves it from the street. To my amazement, it’s sitting on my doorstep and I do a doubletake because it looks suspiciously like the Sunday paper. It’s humongous. As I pick it up I see why it wasn’t thrown. It’s oozing with inserts and weighs a ton. The delivery guy would have separated his shoulder if he had thrown it. I bring it inside, groggily checking the wall calendar to be sure that it’s Thursday (not Sunday). It soon dawns on me that tomorrow is Black Friday, the biggest retail shopping day of the year, and therefore Thanksgiving, when most people have time to settle in with a newspaper and its advertisements, is most probably the biggest day of the year for newspaper insert printers.

Black Friday newspaper inserts from the Boston Globe

Black Friday newspaper inserts from the Boston Globe

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What’s in a name?

Ed Lee
 Apr 25, 2011

A short term challenge that the digital camera industry has not addressed is standardizing on what to call the new crop of interchangeable lens cameras. Technically, they don’t qualify as Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras because they do not contain a mirror box. Mirrorless camera is a term that is currently being used by many, but it is not a name that we think will stand the test of time.

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Digital vs. Print … Publishing Industry Tipping Point Revisited

Jeff Hayes
 Apr 21, 2011

Last summer I wrote a blog suggesting the publishing industry may soon reach a tipping point – a point at which the industry accelerates towards a digital business model and away from a print-based model. Recent financial results from Amazon.com, Gannett, The New York Times, and Apple provide further evidence that the industry is closer to that point.

Books

You probably recall last summer Amazon.com announced for the first time it was selling more Kindle and e-books than hardcover books. In its full year 2010 financial results Amazon.com disclosed some other amazing statistics: Read more »

On Demand Printing, Bankruptcy, and iPads – Irony and Innovation

Jeff Hayes
 Feb 16, 2011

Yesterday, Xerox announced that it is ready to ship its Espresso Book Machine which can print books on demand at retail locations like your corner book store. Today, as reported in the Wall Street Journal, Borders Group — the second largest U.S. chain of retail book stores — filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Are these two items related? Probably not, but I see some irony in the timing of the announcements.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

The Espresso Book Machine is supposed to be a liberator of content, a new revenue stream for traditional brick & mortar bookstores, a solution for the busy consumer that wants a hard copy book. Just install one of these machines and watch the customers come in and print their own books on demand. Xerox proclaims, “Self-publishers can print their latest manuscripts at the corner bookstore, classical books are now available for purchase on demand at libraries, cruise-goers can leave their books at home and print reading materials on the ship.”

The reality is that the number of bookstores has been dropping steadily as buyers shift to on-line purchasing through Amazon.com and other sites.  Why? e-Commerce is a more efficient business model with a better value proposition for most consumers. Read more »

Bad News for Independent Book Stores

Jim Hamilton
 Jan 2, 2011

In December the Minneapolis Star Tribune published an article called “Local bookstores fall to ‘e-book revolution’” about how the combined impact of the economy and the Internet had resulted in the recent closing of four independent book stores in Minnesota. Probably the most depressing aspect in an overall depressing story was the following quote from a representative from one of the bookstores who said, “We’re really now a showroom for books.” What she means is that after browsing in the store, most people then either go home and buy the book on-line or avoid the print version of the book entirely and purchase the e-book. Read more »

Digital vs. Print: Tipping Point for the Publishing Industry?

Jeff Hayes
 Jul 20, 2010

There were several interesting announcements in the publishing industry yesterday that have me thinking deeply about the future of print and digital content.

Books

In the book industry, Amazon.com announced some startling figures related to its Kindle and e-book sales.

  • Amazon.com is now selling more e-books than hardcover books. Over the past three months, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 143 Kindle books. (The ratio is 100 to 180 over the last month!) These figures are across Amazon.com’s entire U.S. book business and include sales of hardcover books where there is no Kindle edition. Free Kindle books are excluded and if included would make the number even higher.
  • Amazon sold more than 3x as many Kindle books in the first half of 2010 as in the first half of 2009. During this period Amazon lowered the price of the Kindle to $189 from $259 (27% reduction).
  • The Association of American Publishers’ latest data reports that e-book sales grew 207% year-to-date through May. Kindle book sales through May exceeded that growth rate.

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Amazon Loses Round 1 of Print-On Demand Book Lawsuit

Jim Hamilton
 Sep 2, 2009

On August 29th the U.S. District Court in Maine ruled on a motion to dismiss a class action suit brought by BookLocker.com against Amazon.com. BookLocker’s suit claims that Amazon violated federal anti-trust law by tying its own on-line book services with the printing services provided by BookSurge, its wholly owned subsidiary. Amazon had moved to dismiss BookLocker’s suit, but it will move forward except for one motion in its filing. This motion relates to an order “requiring full restitution of all funds acquired from Amazon’s unfair business practices, including disgorgement of revenues and/or profits.” Other parts of the motion that were allowed to move forward include “injunctive relief…enjoining Amazon from continuing or engaging in the unfair and anti-competitive activities”; “damages, penalties, and other monetary relief provided by the Clayton Act…including treble damages”; and the ability of the plaintiff to recover the costs of the lawsuit. Read more »

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