A Video Look at Print Samples from drupa 2012

Jim Hamilton
 May 30, 2012

As usual, when I go to a trade show, I collect print samples. This time I ended up with a lot of samples so instead of posting one long video on drupa 2012 samples I’ve broken this up into three segments:

  1. Some Inkjet Print Samples, including ones from the HP Inkjet Web Press, the Kodak Prosper S Series Imprinting System, Xerox’s CiPress 500, and Memjet wide-format implementations from Canon-Océ and Caldera
  2. Enhancement beyond Process Color, including a range of effects including pearlescent, gold, hot pink, white, dimensional, glitter, gloss spot sleeking lamination, Braille, and RFID
  3. Larger Format Digital Print Samples, including long sheets and B2 format

Here they are:


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The Difficulties of Choosing a Name – and the consequence of having more than one

Other Posts
 May 29, 2012

Anyone who has become a parent will know that choosing a name can be difficult. Having many different names can create confusion and I am sure that most people would prefer to be known by one name and perhaps a nickname. Now imagine if you had at least 7 different names. That is the case for what InfoTrends calls compact interchangeable lens cameras (CILC).  Since the first compact interchangeable lens cameras were announced by Panasonic and Olympus in 2008 under the Micro Four Thirds name, they have acquired a number of new names including:

  • Mirrorless DSL
  • Mirrorless hybrid
  • DSL Micro
  • Compact interchangeable  lens camera
  • Compact system camera
  • Non-Reflex
  • Advanced Camera Interchangeable Lens

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Just Another iPhone App Called “Camera”?

Alan Bullock
 May 25, 2012


Yesterday, seemingly without warning, Facebook launched an iPhone app called Camera. With it, users can take pictures, apply editing filters, share them with other users, and “like” and comment on others’ pictures. If you’re thinking that this sounds a lot like Instagram, you’re right. If you’re thinking that Facebook has re-branded and re-released Instagram just six weeks after announcing its agreement to acquire the company for a cool $1 billion, you’re wrong. That deal hasn’t even closed yet, and Facebook Camera was reportedly in development before that news broke in early April.

At first glance, the two apps appear to be very similar, but there are some significant differences. Read more »

Google and Motorola Join Circles

Carrie Sylvester
 May 23, 2012

On May 22, 2012, Google’s deal to purchase Motorola Mobility became official. The final purchase price was $12.5 billion. Google will run Motorola Mobility as a separate business that will be headed by Dennis Woodside, former President of Google’s Americas region. Woodside has created a team of new executives with varied industry backgrounds (DARPA, Amazon and NVIDIA) along with some members of Motorola Mobility’s team. Under the terms of the acquisition, Motorola Mobility will remain a licensee of the Android operating system and Android will remain open.

The big questions on many minds is what does this mean for Google’s open platform and how does it benefit the mobile industry?

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Camera Phones/Smartphones may Bolster Photo Print Market

David Haueter
 

There is concern in the photo industry that the migration from digital still cameras to camera phones/smartphones and their increased usage will lead to fewer photos being printed. The concern is valid, as camera phones/smartphones provide an easy on-ramp for photos to be sent to online sites, which could potentially take print completely out of the viewing and sharing process.

We believe that for the near term the opposite will be true; that increased camera phone/smartphone usage will actually lead to more prints being generated. The rationale behind our thinking is that as more people rely on their camera phones/smartphones as everyday cameras and even use them more for special events, that a growing percentage of these photos will be important photos that they will want to share, preserve, or display as prints.

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A White Paper Storm

Jim Hamilton
 May 22, 2012

In the days leading up to drupa I was awash in a storm of writing activity that resulted in four white papers that were published either right before or during the show:

Each of these is available as a free download from InfoTrends, just click the link above. All of these white papers relate to one or more key trends from drupa 2012, including high-speed color inkjet systems, hybrid inkjet configurations with offset or other processes, substrates for inkjet that open up new application opportunities, and the move to B2 format digital. If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at jim_hamilton@infotrends.com.

Nikon DSLRs – Back to Normal

Ed Lee
 May 18, 2012

In October 2011, Nikon’s DSLR camera factory in Thailand was devastated by flood waters, which caused the complete shutdown of its entry-level and mid-range DSLR production lines right before the critical holiday season.

In its year-end Fiscal results, Nikon highlighted the events and its recovery timeline.

  • October 6, 2011: Operations suspended at Nikon Thailand Corporation (NTC) due to the fact that the factory was submerged under 2 meters of flood waters. The flood came at a critical time of the year, when all camera manufacturers were gearing up for the all-important holiday season and beginning production ramp up of soon-to-be announced cameras.
  • November 30, 2011: Nikon restarted partial deliveries of DSLR cameras and interchangeable lenses thanks to alternative production by Thai partner factories.
  • January 3, 2012: Partial operations resumed at NTC, as Nikon had forecasted would happen back in November.
  • January to March 2012: NTC ramped up its camera production, adding to finished goods produced by partner factories.
  • By the end of March, the combined production capacity of NTC and partner factories had reached normal production levels.

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drupa Attendance Is Down – By a Lot

Jim Hamilton
 May 17, 2012

The drupa 2012 organizers announced final attendance figures today. The total: 314,500. The stunner in this news isn’t that attendance dropped between drupa 2008 and 2012, it’s by how much. drupa attendance peaked in 1990, dropped off in 1995, and then came in at well over 400,000 in 2000. The next two drupas were both around around 390,000. The drupa 2012 figure is down about 75,000 from drupa 2008. Going into the show I hoped that final attendance figures would end up between 350,000 and 375,000. As it turns out, this was very optimistic. The newly released numbers tell a different story entirely.

drupa attendance

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Adobe Aims to Enable More Efficient Interactive Publication Workflows

Other Posts
 

Magazine publishers have been experimenting with digital editions for quite some time, typically through the use of PDF replicas of the print edition including varying degrees of interactive enhancement. Before the launch of the iPad and subsequent tablets, reading digital editions was largely relegated to the laptop. For road warriors always on-the-go who wanted to keep with their magazine subscriptions, this model worked well. For most other consumers, the experience wasn’t ideal, and digital edition adoption was limited to a niche audience. Post-iPad launch, however, tablet adoption soared, and publishers started experimenting with delivering their magazines in a format optimized for the native capabilities of tablets, including touch interfaces, powerful processors, and web connectivity.

Time Magazine, Wired, and many others came out with interactive digital publications on the iPad during or closely after its launch. These interactive apps featured print content tailored to fit within the screen resolution of the iPad and other tablets, as well as optimized navigation for touch gestures and the inclusion of rich media and animated components in editorial and advertising content. Even though these types of interactive apps have only been in existence since spring 2010, these features are the gold standard for tablet digital editions, and hundreds of publishers have taken the plunge to make their magazines more interactive. Adobe provides key enabling technology for publishers to generate digital editions with its Digital Publishing Suite (DPS). Read more »

Canon Océ’s Hidden, but Not Secret, Drupa Technology Announcement

Riley McNulty
 May 15, 2012

One of the more interesting drupa 2012 announcements took place not in Düsseldorf, but in Poing Germany. Canon Océ held an event with 20 or so press and analysts to introduce the new Océ InfiniStream technology. Although the prototype B2 lithographic liquid toner press looked like a finished product, Canon Océ executives stressed that theirs was a technology announcement, because they continue to refine the new platform. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made toward productizing the technology, and Canon Océ says a full launch of the InfiniStream press can be expected within 12 to 18 months.

The Océ InfiniStream technology

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